Posts Tagged ‘spacecraft’

Geo Party! Pima Air and Space Museum Category

Posted by Zoe on 19th October 2013 in Geo Party, Main Page

This past week, we toured the Pima Air and Space Museum in Tucson, Arizona, full of planes, spacecraft, and all sorts of cool things.

The Petulant Porpoise, one of the airplanes on display at the museum.

The Petulant Porpoise, one of the airplanes on display at the museum. What a name, huh?

Miss a clue? Rewatch all five with the links below.

Clue 1

Clue 2

Clue 3

Clue 4

Clue 5

Geo Party! Pima Air and Space Museum Clue 5

Posted by Zoe on 18th October 2013 in Geo Party

Finally, the space part of the Pima Air and Space Museum.

Click here to watch game one and the rest of the current game.

Episode 7 Bonus Track

Posted by Zoe on 30th May 2013 in Main Page

You’ve just met Dr. Britney Schmidt, an astrobiologist, in Exogeology ROCKS! Episode 7. Now, hear from her about plans for a spacecraft to go to Europa and what might be found there.

New Photo Gallery!

Posted by Zoe on 13th April 2010 in Main Page

Hello out there! It’s Zoë again with great news! I now have a working Photo Gallery up. Petra posted new blogs recently too, about a post per day, so keep checking up on her on Exogeology ROCKS!

The photo gallery is over on the sidebar underneath the “Games and Puzzles” category. I’ve made 5 different sets of photographs: Mineral and Rock Samples, Geologic Formations, Astronomy Pictures, Spacecraft and Landers, and Telescopes and Observatories. Check them all out! Each photo has a great description of whatever it has in it, and the pictures ROCK!

Until next time, I’m Zoë Bentley and Exogeology ROCKS!

A Day in the Life of an Exogeologist

Posted by Petra on 3rd April 2010 in Petra's Blog

Want to know just what an exogeologist does all day? Well, maybe I can show you just how cool this job is!

When I start working for the day, the first thing I do is see if I’ve received any new data. This could be from other exogeologists or from different spacecraft. I sometimes even get rock samples to analyze. If I do, I’ll take them to the lab. There I’ll test the sample to find out its composition.

There are lots of tests I can do. I can test minerals for streak, hardness, cleavage or fracture, and of course note the color and shape of the crystals. For example, let’s say I was given a mineral sample to identify. It has cube-shaped crystals, and is gold in color.  I rub it on a streak plate, and the streak is greenish black. I’ll scratch it with various tools and deduce that its Mohs hardness is 6. When I break it with a hammer, the place where it breaks is conchoidal (a distinctive curved shape). All these things put together tell me that my mineral is pyrite. If I were given a rock sample, there are a lot of various tests I could do to classify a rock, like cutting a thin slice and looking at it under a microscope.

  • Here’s a quick tip about classifying rocks: If it has bubbles, it’s got to be igneous. Those bubbles are called vesicles, and they’re made when gas bubbles are trapped inside a rock as it cools.

Some days I’ll go to an observatory to do research on a planet. I need to reserve the telescope ahead of time usually. When I used a telescope at the Kitt Peak observatory, I had to reserve the telescope years in advance! But it was worth it. I got some great photographs of Jupiter and a comet during my time at the telescope. I’ve used lots of different observatories, and it’s always been productive. Well, except for that one time when it rained… I had to cancel. I must have been really unlucky that time. But that’s the trouble with astronomy; sometimes you just have to wait for another clear night. At least every other time went well.

Other days I’ll get information from a spacecraft or lander! That’s my favorite part! Once, I got to help with the LCROSS mission and interpret data from the spectrometer. The goal was to find water, and we did! That ROCKS! Since Mars is my specialty, I’ve been receiving data from the Mars Odyssey orbiter, which maps the amount of chemical elements and their distribution. I loved working on that. Maybe I’ll get to interpret data from the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). Part of the MSL’s mission will be to study the geology of Mars.

Exogeology ROCKS!